WVU Extension Service: The Orchard Monitor: Committed to the Integration of Orchard Management Practices
February 6, 2006

Upcoming Events Spray Bulletin Plant Pathology

Agrability Project

Berkeley/Jefferson Counties
 Fruit School
Hampshire County Fruit School

 

UPCOMING EVENTS

February 10, 8:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. - Winchester Area Commercial Fruit Production School at War Memorial Building in Jim Barnett Park , Winchester , VA. Registration fee (includes lunch) is $8 at the door. Recertification credits will be provided for pesticide applicators. For more information contact the Frederick County Extension Office at 540-665-5699, or email Cyndi Marston at cmarston@vt.edu.

February 22-25. - 2006 Mid-Atlantic Direct Marketing Conference and Trade Show at the Sheraton Reading Hotel in Reading , PA. For more information visit www.MADMC.com, or contact John Berry at 610-391-9840 or at jwb15@psu.edu.

February 23, 8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Western Maryland Regional Fruit Meeting at Western Maryland Research and Education Center, Keedysville, MD. Registration fee (includes program materials, refreshments and lunch) is $25 by February 17. For more information contact Cindy Mason at 301-432-2767 x301.

February 26 - March 1. - International Fruit Tree Association Annual Convention and Tours at Hershey Lodge and Convention Center, Hershey , PA. For more information contact Susan Pheasant at 509-884-5651 or at pheasant@ifruittree.org.

March 8, 8:00 a.m. - 4:15 p.m. - Berkeley/Jefferson Counties Winter Fruit School at the WVU Tree Fruit Research and Education Center , Kearneysville , WV .  See enclosed brochure.  Registration fee is $12 by March 1 or $15 at the door. Recertification credits will be provided for pesticide applicators. For more information contact the WVU-KTFREC at 304-876-6353 or at Deborah.Blue@mail.wvu.edu.

March 9, 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. - Hampshire County Winter Fruit School at the Hampshire High School Vo-Ag Building, Romney, WV.  See enclosed brochure.  Registration fee is $12 by March 1 or $15 at the door.  Recertification credits will be provided for pesticide applicators. For more information contact the Hampshire County Extension Office at 304-822-5013 or at Bob.ChevesJr@mail.wvu.edu.

March 11, 5:30 p.m. - A retirement party to recognize the many years of service to WVU by Dr. Richard "Dick" Zimmerman will be held in the Martinsburg area. This event will be a dinner/dance to include a program to honor and "roast" the retiree. For complete details and to receive a written invitation, please contact former Jefferson County Extension Agent Jim Staley at 304-267-8203 or at jimstaley03@msn.com.

March 13-16. - West Virginia Ag Safety Days at the WVU Tree Fruit Research and Education Center , Kearneysville , WV . Recertification credits will be provided for various training programs. Register (free) before March 6. For more information contact Kathy Martin at 304-558-2209.

March 16, 23, 30, April 6, 7:00 - 9:00 p.m., April 8, 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. - Advanced Beekeeping Short Course sponsored by the Eastern Panhandle Beekeepers Association (EPBA) and the Hagerstown Valley Apian Society (HVAS) at the WVU Tree Fruit Research and Education Center, Kearneysville, WV.  The registration fee is $35 per person, $10 for second family member (in same household) by March 1. For more information contact Dave Freese at 304-267-6188 or visit www.epbawv.org.   

SPRAY BULLETIN

The 2006 Virginia/West Virginia/ Maryland Spray Bulletin For Commercial Tree Fruit Growers will be available by mid-February, however, the cost is yet to be determined. Contact the WVU-KTFREC at 304-876-6353, or at Deborah.Blue@mail.wvu.edu after mid-February to determine availability and cost.

PLANT PATHOLOGY

Peach leaf curl should be controlled in the spring with a fungicide application before the buds swell, unless you already made a leaf curl application in the fall. If leaf curl was severe in your peach and nectarine blocks in 2005, and you made your fall fungicide application to control the disease for 2006, a spring fungicide application may be needed to ensure complete disease control. In orchards where careful monitoring is practiced and where leaf curl has not been present for two or more years, this spray can be omitted until the disease begins to recur. For best control of peach leaf curl, make a dilute application of fungicide under calm conditions, making sure to cover each bud thoroughly. Using one of the fixed coppers for the leaf curl spray may help suppress bacterial spot in blocks where this disease is a problem. See the 2006 Spray Bulletin for fungicides and rates of application.

Phytophthora root rot can be managed with mefanoxam (Ridomil Gold EC and Ridomil 5G) and will aid in the control of crown, collar, and other root rots caused by Phytophthora spp. on both bearing and non-bearing apple trees. Ridomil 5G can be used in nonbearing orchards only. Applications should be made on a preventative schedule before symptoms appear, especially in orchards where conditions are favorable for disease development. Ridomil should not be expected to revitalize trees showing moderate to severe disease symptoms. Ridomil is not registered for use as a preplanting dip treatment. For best results, make one application at the time of planting or in the spring before growth starts. Make another application in the fall after harvest. Ridomil is highly specific and will not control other agents causing similar tree decline symptoms, including but not limited to other fungal root rots, graft union necrosis (tomato ringspot virus) and vole damage.

Apple scab urea application. A spray of 5% solution of urea (46-0-0) in water may be applied to apple leaves on the ground if this was not done in the autumn (42 lb. urea in 100 gal. water, applied at 100 gallons/acre). The nitrogen will hasten leaf litter decomposition and may result in reduced inoculum from the apple scab fungus. Moving leaves from under the trees to the row middles with a leaf blower and then shredding them with a flail mower is a good alternative to the urea spray for small acreages.

AGRABILITY PROJECT

The West Virginia AgrAbility Project has been awarded a new four-year grant through the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The 2005-2009 grant renews the partnership between WVU Safety and Health Extension, West Virginia Assistive Technology System, and Northern West Virginia Center for Independent Living.

Project staff will continue to work with farmers, farm workers, and farm families to identify ergonomic adaptations, assistive technology, and other tools to accommodate injuries and chronic health conditions. In its first four years, West Virginia AgrAbility loaned more than 180 assistive devices-like long-handled and ergonomic gardening tools, flame weeders, and gate latches-to farmers needing help to conduct farm work.

Thirty-two percent of the state's adults say their work activities are limited by arthritis or other joint problems, according to a recent study by the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources. West Virginians ' do-it-yourself attitude often makes farmers and other self-employed people continue to work through pain, injury, or chronic health conditions.

"Given the nature of farm work-constant bending, twisting, and heavy lifting-farmers and farm workers are especially vulnerable to arthritis-related disabilities," said Inetta Fluharty, field operations manager for the West Virginia AgrAbility Project. "In addition, unlike many workers who retire in their mid-60s, people in production agriculture tend to continue working well into their 70s or even 80s. Over a lifetime, the toll such strenuous physical labor takes on the body-especially one affected by arthritis or rheumatic disease-can make farming truly difficult."

In addition to providing on-site technical assistance, staff members offer information and referral, training for rural professionals, education on preventing additional injuries, and peer support groups for farmers. Virtually any farmer may receive free services through West Virginia AgrAbility because he or she needs a minimum of only $1,000 in annual sales of agricultural products to be eligible for technical assistance, education, and networking. AgrAbility staff work one-on-one with orchardists, diversified vegetable growers, woodland herb producers, and livestock producers.

To find out more about the West Virginia AgrAbility Project, call 800-841-8346 (toll-free), send an e-mail (assist@cebridge.net), or visit the Web site (www.cedwvu.org/programs/agrability).



applepcx.gif (13012 bytes)                            Berkeley/Jefferson Counties
                                    Winter Fruit School


March 8, 2006
WVU Tree Fruit Research and Education Center
Kearneysville, W. Va.

 

Morning         Presiding: Alan Biggs               

8:00         Registration - $12 by March 1; $15 on site

8:30         West Virginia State Horticultural Society President's Address - 
   
            
Karen Burkhart, President, WVSHS

8:45         West Virginia State Horticultural Society Annual Business Meeting - 
   
             Karen Burkhart, President, WVSHS

9:00         Performance of New Peach Tree Growth Types - 
   
             Steve Miller, Research Horticulturist, Appalachian Fruit Research Station

9:30         Considerations in Diversification into Small Fruits for Tree Fruit Growers - 
                J
oseph Fiola, Specialist in Viticulture and Small Fruit, University of Maryland , WMREC

10:15       Refreshment Break

10:30       Alternative Production and Marketing Strategies to Increase Profits - 
   
             Robert Black, Catoctin Mountain Orchard, Thurmont , MD

11:00       West Virginia Farm Bureau Update and Legislative Agenda - 
   
             Robert Williams, Executive Director, West Virginia Farm Bureau

11:30       Labor Issues and Options for the West Virginia Fruit Industry - 
   
             Gayla Steward-Reardon, Farm Labor Specialist, Work Force WV Career Center, Martinsburg

12:00       Catered Lunch

Afternoon       Presiding: Henry Hogmire

1:00         2006 Spray Bulletin Update (Panel) - 
   
             Rakesh Chandran, WVU Weed Scientist; Alan Biggs, WVU Plant Pathologist; Henry Hogmire,
                WVU Entomologist

1:45         Understanding Peach Rusty Spot Epidemics - 
   
             Norman Lalancette, Extension Specialist - Tree Fruit Pathology, Rutgers University

2:15         Refreshment Break

2:30         Preemergence Herbicide Evaluation in Apple: Preliminary Results
   
             Rakesh Chandran, Weed Scientist, West Virginia University

3:00         A Reduced-Risk Pest Management Program in West Virginia Orchards:
    Summary of 4-year RAMP Project - 

   
Henry Hogmire, Entomologist, West Virginia University

3:30         RAMP Participant Grower Panel - 
   
Dave Cosby, National Fruit Products Co.; Ron Slonaker, Jefferson Orchards; Mark Orr, George S. Orr & Sons

4:00         Distribution of Attendance Form for Pesticide Applicator Recertification

---------------------------------------------------------------

BERKELEY/JEFFERSON COUNTIES WINTER FRUIT SCHOOL REGISTRATION FORM

                  Name:___________________________________________________________________________________

      Address:_________________________________________________________Phone:__________________

                            March
8 -  Berkeley/Jefferson Counties Winter Fruit School________@ $12.00 ea. = _____________

Please return this form along with a check by March 1 payable to WVSHS, PO Box 1048, Ranson, WV 25438.



applepcx.gif (13012 bytes)                                     Hampshire County 
                                     Winter Fruit School


March 9, 2006
Hampshire High School Vo-Ag Building
Romney, W. Va.

Morning         Presiding: Robert Cheves               

8:00         Registration - $12 by March 1; $15 on site

8:30         West Virginia State Horticultural Society President's Address - 
   
            
Karen Burkhart, President, WVSHS

8:45         West Virginia Farm Bureau Update and Legislative Agenda - 
   
             Robert Williams, Executive Director, West Virginia Farm Bureau

9:15         Understanding Peach Rusty Spot Epidemics - 
   
             Norman Lalancette, Extension Specialist - Tree Fruit Pathology, Rutgers University

9:45         Alternative Production and Marketing Strategies to Increase Profits - 
   
             Calvin Riggleman, Smith's Orchard, Loom, WV; 
Robert Cheves, Hampshire County Extension Agent,
                West Virginia
University

10:15       Refreshment Break

10:30       Considerations in Diversification into Small Fruits for Tree Fruit Growers - 
   
             Joseph Fiola, Specialist in Viticulture and Small Fruit, University of Maryland , WMREC

11:15       2006 Spray Bulletin Update (Panel) - 
   
            
Rakesh Chandran, WVU Weed Scientist; Alan Biggs, WVU Plant Pathologist; Henry Hogmire,
                WVU Entomologist

12:00       Catered Lunch

Afternoon       Presiding: Robert Cheves

1:00         Labor Issues and Options for the West Virginia Fruit Industry - 
   
             Gayla Steward-Reardon, Farm Labor Specialist, Work Force WV Career Center, Martinsburg

1:45         Performance of New Peach Tree Growth Types - 
   
            
Steve Miller, Research Horticulturist, Appalachian Fruit Research Station

2:15         Refreshment Break

2:30         Preemergence Herbicide Evaluation in Apple: Preliminary Results - 
   
             Rakesh Chandran, Weed Scientist, West Virginia University

3:00         A Reduced-Risk Pest Management Program in West Virginia Orchards:
   Summary of 4-year RAMP Project

   
Henry Hogmire, Entomologist, West Virginia University ; Garry Shanholtz, Shanholtz Orchards

3:45         Distribution of Attendance Form for Pesticide Applicator Recertification

----------------------------------------------------------------                        
HAMPSHIRE COUNTY WINTER FRUIT
SCHOOL
REGISTRATION FORM  

Name:_______________________________________________________________________________________

Address:_____________________________________________________________Phone:__________________

    March 9 -  Hampshire County Winter Fruit School__________@ $12.00 ea. = ___________________


Please return this form along with a check payable to WVSHS by March 1 to Robert Cheves, Hampshire County Extension Office, PO Box 1880, Romney, WV 26757-1880.


READ THE LABEL CAREFULLY AND USE THE CHEMICALS IN ACCORDANCE WITH LABEL CAUTIONS, WARNING AND DIRECTIONS. REQUEST A MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET (MSDS) FROM THE MANUFACTURER FOR EACH PRODUCT YOU USE.

Trade and brand names are used only for the purpose of information, and the West Virginia University Extension Service does not guarantee nor warrant the standard of the product, nor does it imply approval of the product to the exclusion of others which may also be suitable. The West Virginia University Extension service assumes no responsibility in the use of hazardous chemicals.

Individuals requesting an accommodation at an Extension Meeting because of a disability should contact one of the Specialists at the WVU Tree Fruit Research and Education Center at 304-876-6353 at least 5 days prior to the meeting date.


Helping you put knowledge to work


WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY
TREE FRUIT RESEARCH AND EDUCATION CENTER
P. O. BOX 609
KEARNEYSVILLE, WV 25430-0609
PHONE:  304-876-6353
FAX:  304-876-6034
WEB:  www.caf.wvu.edu/kearneysville/wvufarm1.html

The West Virginia University Cooperative Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, West Virginia County
Boards of Education and County Commissions Cooperating.  Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Institution


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