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Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists Career

Career Description

Research or develop geospatial technologies. May produce databases, perform applications programming, or coordinate projects. May specialize in areas such as agriculture, mining, health care, retail trade, urban planning, or military intelligence.

What Job Titles Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists Might Have

  • Geographic Information System Analyst (GIS Analyst)
  • Geographic Information Systems Analyst (GIS Analyst)
  • Geographic Information Systems Coordinator (GIS Coordinator)
  • Geographic Information Systems Specialist (GIS Specialist)

What Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists Do

  • Produce data layers, maps, tables, or reports, using spatial analysis procedures or Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology, equipment, or systems.
  • Provide technical expertise in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to clients or users.
  • Perform computer programming, data analysis, or software development for Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications, including the maintenance of existing systems or research and development for future enhancements.
  • Read current literature, talk with colleagues, continue education, or participate in professional organizations or conferences to keep abreast of developments in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology, equipment, or systems.
  • Lead, train, or supervise technicians or related staff in the conduct of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analytical procedures.
  • Perform integrated or computerized Geographic Information Systems (GIS) analyses to address scientific problems.
  • Collect, compile, or integrate Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data, such as remote sensing or cartographic data for inclusion in map manuscripts.
  • Conduct or coordinate research, data analysis, systems design, or support for software such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) or Global Positioning Systems (GPS) mapping software.
  • Create, edit, or analyze geospatial data, using Global Positioning Systems (GPS) or digitizing techniques.
  • Meet with clients to discuss topics such as technical specifications, customized solutions, or operational problems.
  • Document, design, code, or test Geographic Information Systems (GIS) models, internet mapping solutions, or other applications.
  • Create, analyze, report, convert, or transfer data, using specialized applications program software.
  • Develop new applications for geospatial technology in areas such as farmland preservation, pollution measurement, or utilities operations management.
  • Design, program, or model Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications or procedures.
  • Coordinate the development or administration of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) projects, including the development of technical priorities, client reporting and interface, or coordination and review of schedules and budgets.
  • Develop specialized computer software routines, internet-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) databases, or business applications to customize geographic information.
  • Make recommendations regarding upgrades considering implications of new or revised Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software, equipment, or applications.
  • Assist users in formulating Geographic Information Systems (GIS) requirements or understanding the implications of alternatives.
  • Create visual representations of geospatial data using complex procedures, such as analytical modeling, three-dimensional renderings, or plot creation.
  • Prepare training materials for or make presentations to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) users.
  • Coordinate or direct research or publication activities of technicians or related staff.
  • Provide technical support for computer-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) mapping software.

What Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists Should Be Good At

  • Written Comprehension - The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Written Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Inductive Reasoning - The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Information Ordering - The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Category Flexibility - The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Speech Clarity - The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.
  • Speech Recognition - The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.

What Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists Should Be Interested In

  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
  • Realistic - Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.

What Geospatial Information Scientists and Technologists Need to Learn

  • Geography - Knowledge of principles and methods for describing the features of land, sea, and air masses, including their physical characteristics, locations, interrelationships, and distribution of plant, animal, and human life.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • Education and Training - Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
  • Design - Knowledge of design techniques, tools, and principles involved in production of precision technical plans, blueprints, drawings, and models.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
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Median Salary: $86,510

This page includes information from O*NET OnLine by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license.