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Risk Management Specialists Career

Career Description

Analyze and manage risk management issues by identifying, measuring, and making decisions on operational or enterprise risks for an organization.

What Job Titles Risk Management Specialists Might Have

  • Chief Risk Officer
  • Credit Risk Management Director
  • Risk Management Director
  • Risk Manager

What Risk Management Specialists Do

  • Document, and ensure communication of, key risks.
  • Maintain input or data quality of risk management systems.
  • Recommend ways to control or reduce risk.
  • Identify key risks and mitigating factors of potential investments, such as asset types and values, legal and ownership structures, professional reputations, customer bases, or industry segments.
  • Devise systems and processes to monitor validity of risk modeling outputs.
  • Gather risk-related data from internal or external resources.
  • Identify and analyze areas of potential risk to the assets, earning capacity, or success of organizations.
  • Develop or implement risk-assessment models or methodologies.
  • Produce reports or presentations that outline findings, explain risk positions, or recommend changes.
  • Plan, and contribute to development of, risk management systems.
  • Conduct statistical analyses to quantify risk, using statistical analysis software or econometric models.
  • Meet with clients to answer queries on subjects such as risk exposure, market scenarios, or values-at-risk calculations.
  • Devise scenario analyses reflecting possible severe market events.
  • Develop contingency plans to deal with emergencies.
  • Confer with traders to identify and communicate risks associated with specific trading strategies or positions.
  • Analyze new legislation to determine impact on risk exposure.
  • Track, measure, or report on aspects of market risk for traded issues.
  • Review or draft risk disclosures for offer documents.

What Risk Management Specialists Should Be Good At

  • Problem Sensitivity - The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Inductive Reasoning - The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Written Comprehension - The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Mathematical Reasoning - The ability to choose the right mathematical methods or formulas to solve a problem.
  • Written Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Information Ordering - The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).
  • Category Flexibility - The ability to generate or use different sets of rules for combining or grouping things in different ways.
  • Speech Recognition - The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.
  • Speech Clarity - The ability to speak clearly so others can understand you.

What Risk Management Specialists Should Be Interested In

  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
  • Investigative - Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.

What Risk Management Specialists Need to Learn

  • Mathematics - Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.
  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Economics and Accounting - Knowledge of economic and accounting principles and practices, the financial markets, banking and the analysis and reporting of financial data.
  • Administration and Management - Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.
  • Computers and Electronics - Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
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Median Salary: $69,470

This page includes information from O*NET OnLine by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license.