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Home / Academics / Careers / Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Career

Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Career

Career Description

Search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance documents or details for a variety of purposes. May compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms, real estate agencies, or title insurance companies.

What Job Titles Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Might Have

  • Abstracter
  • Title Examiner
  • Title Officer
  • Title Searcher

What Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Do

  • Examine documentation such as mortgages, liens, judgments, easements, plat books, maps, contracts, and agreements to verify factors such as properties' legal descriptions, ownership, or restrictions.
  • Examine individual titles to determine if restrictions, such as delinquent taxes, will affect titles and limit property use.
  • Prepare reports describing any title encumbrances encountered during searching activities, and outlining actions needed to clear titles.
  • Copy or summarize recorded documents, such as mortgages, trust deeds, and contracts, that affect property titles.
  • Verify accuracy and completeness of land-related documents accepted for registration, preparing rejection notices when documents are not acceptable.
  • Prepare lists of all legal instruments applying to a specific piece of land and the buildings on it.
  • Read search requests to ascertain types of title evidence required and to obtain descriptions of properties and names of involved parties.
  • Obtain maps or drawings delineating properties from company title plants, county surveyors, or assessors' offices.
  • Confer with realtors, lending institution personnel, buyers, sellers, contractors, surveyors, and courthouse personnel to exchange title-related information or to resolve problems.
  • Enter into record-keeping systems appropriate data needed to create new title records or update existing ones.
  • Retrieve and examine real estate closing files for accuracy and to ensure that information included is recorded and executed according to regulations.
  • Prepare real estate closing statements, using knowledge and expertise in real estate procedures.
  • Prepare and issue title commitments and title insurance policies based on information compiled from title searches.
  • Direct activities of workers who search records and examine titles, assigning, scheduling, and evaluating work, and providing technical guidance as necessary.
  • Determine whether land-related documents can be registered under the relevant legislation such as the Land Titles Act.
  • Assess fees related to registration of property-related documents.
  • Summarize pertinent legal or insurance details, or sections of statutes or case law from reference books so that they can be used in examinations, or as proofs or ready reference.

What Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Should Be Good At

  • Oral Comprehension - The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.
  • Written Comprehension - The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.
  • Oral Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.
  • Written Expression - The ability to communicate information and ideas in writing so others will understand.
  • Deductive Reasoning - The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Near Vision - The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).
  • Speech Recognition - The ability to identify and understand the speech of another person.

What Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Should Be Interested In

  • Conventional - Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.
  • Enterprising - Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.

What Title Examiners, Abstractors and Searchers Need to Learn

  • English Language - Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.
  • Law and Government - Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Clerical - Knowledge of administrative and clerical procedures and systems such as word processing, managing files and records, stenography and transcription, designing forms, and other office procedures and terminology.
  • Customer and Personal Service - Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.
Median Salary: $45,800

This page includes information from O*NET OnLine by the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA). Used under the CC BY 4.0 license.